Joaquim Alves Gaspar | Principal Investigator

Retired officer of the Portuguese Navy, specialist in Navigation, master in Physical Oceanography and doctor in Geographical Information Systems. Has been dedicated to the history of nautical cartography since 2005. His research will mostly focus on the cartometric analysis and numerical modelling of charts. 

Henrique Leitão | Senior Researcher​

Doctor in Physics, present head of the Department of History and Philosophy of Science of the Faculty of Sciences, University of Lisbon. His research during the last years has been dedicated to the History of Early-modern Science, especially Mathematics, Astronomy and Nautical Science. His contribution to the project will mostly focus on the study of texts and in the multi-spectral analysis of manuscript charts.

André Ferrand de Almeida | Researcher​


Bachelor in History, University of Coimbra. Masters in History of the Discoveries and the Portuguese Expansion, New University of Lisbon. André has previously worked on the Iberian cartography of South America, focusing particularly on the mapping of Colonial Brazil and of the Amazon basin. He is a longtime collaborator of the Department of Cartography of the National Library of Portugal and a contributor to Cartography in the European Enlightenment, Volume Four of The History of Cartography, that will be published by The University of Chicago Press during 2019. He has a broad interest in manuscript and printed cartography during the Early Modern period. In the framework of his PhD project he will be working on nautical charts in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe.

Gregory McIntosh | Researcher​

Bachelor in Philosophy with a much diversified professional experience which includes aeronautical engineering, art gallery direction and project managing, and is a well-known author in early modern exploration and cartography, particularly in the Piri Reis map. He is doing research on maps and nautical charts between 13th and 16th century has part of his PhD project. 

Bruno Almeida | Post-doctoral Researcher​

Bachelor in Physics engineering and doctor in History of Science and Technology. His PhD dissertation was dedicated to the influence of Pedro Nunes’s work in Europe during the 16th century. He will be working mostly in early modern cartography and nautical science. In parallel to his research, Bruno Almeida is also a lyric singer.

Sima Krtalic | PhD Student

 

Bachelor in Liberal Arts, Sarah Lawrence College. Master in Archaeological Materials Science, Universidade de Évora. With professional experience in translation and pedagogy, and an academic background in art history, fine art, social science, and material analysis, Sima’s interest is in probing the function of artworks as didactic aids, luxury items, physical objects, and more. Her previous work on cartography included a study of the materials, production methods, and context of the maps included in António Bocarro’s “Livro das Plantas de Todas As Fortalezas…” Sima’s current research centers on the aesthetic logic of portolan charts, the ways their designs were executed and transmitted, and their functions as social signifiers. 

Ricardo Vaz | Junior Researcher

Bachelor and masters in Computer engineering by the Faculty of Sciences, University of Lisbon. His master thesis, entitled “Visualização Analítica de Agregações de Trajetos com Rosas dos Ventos”, focus on using wind roses to analyse aggregated tracks over maps. Ricardo has a masters specialisation in Information Systems and will be developing a management system for studied charts by the MEDEA-CHART team.

Ana Margarida Nunes | Research Management and Communication

Degree in Biology with doctorate and post-doctorate studies in Neuroscience, dedicated to neurodegeneration and cell death in disease. In the last years, Ana has gained extensive and diverse experience in science management, funding and communication. Nonetheless, this diversity is grounded on a wider professional career path focused on promoting Portuguese research and research in general, as well as on building more direct communication between science and society through the arts.